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to all agree with every law that is passed. i don't agree with the laws that restrict contraception use now being put forth in different states around the country. i feel like those infringe on my rights as well. >> nothing infringes on your rights. >> you don't have to work at hobby lobby. economicception is an check issue for many women. >> this is about forcing the employer to give it to you for free. >> happy new. >> sean: and we continue to monitor here on the fox news channel america on the brink. the latest on the fiscal cliff. let not your heart be troubled. that is all the time we have left but greta is standing by to go on the record. we'll see you back here monday captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >> greta: this s a fox news alert. 74 hours to go before president obama, the senate and the house shove america off the fiscal cliff. let's go to capitol hill fox news chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel live with the latest. >> we are heading into a critical weekend as a final push is made to keep the u.s. economy from going off the fiscal cliff. after a lat
alarmed people in neighboring countries. senior officials have met with their u.s. counterparts to coordinate their response. south korea's chief nuclear negotiator and the head of the japanese foreign ministries headed to washington. they met with u.s. special representative on north korea, glen davies. they will continue diplomatic efforts until the last minute. >> translator: we also agreed that the international community should take firm action if north korea goes ahead with the launch. >> sugiyama said he hopes to visit beijing to discuss the matter with chinese officials. >> they're ignored warnings over the year when they went ahead with a launch that ended in failure. covering the korean peninsula, we see why leaders in the north are pushing ahead despite opposition. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took power a year ago. it will use the same launch pad, a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first testing, officials said the three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan and the u.s. and so
regulation authority. u.s. and european scientists offered advice on nuclear safety. richard meserve is former chairman of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. he says people overseeing the nuclear industry must have technical skills if they are to properly enforce regulations and that those skills must be continuously assessed. he also said foreign staff should be hired if necessary. andre-claude lacoste is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say prior to the fukushima accident, the operators only implemented the safety measures that were legally required. he said it's dangerous for plant operators to rely only on state regulations and that they should be encouraged to voluntarily enhance safety. the chairman of the nuclear regulation authority says he's not satisfied with the safety awareness level in japan's nuclear plants. shunichi tanaka says the country must boost those measures by listening to the advice of foreign experts. >>> north korea says any criticism of the rocket launch they carried out this week will be taken as a declaration of war. more than 100,00
-range rocket launch that's managed to put a satellite in earth's orbit. here's why it is important to all of us. even though north korea is one of the poorest countries and many people are starving there, the korean peninsula is the most tense, most dangerous places on earth. there are roughly one million north korean troops on it is side of the militarize zone separating from south korea. as well as nearly 30,000 u.s. forces. not only are they within strikes distance of the launch site, a long-range rocket shows north korea is on its way to developing technology to launch a rocket at the united states's west coast and hawaii. officials tell cnn that the working assumption is that the north koreans got outside help from others, including iran. so today's launch is raising some huge concerns. let's go to our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. i assume they are pretty surprised and alarmed by the successful launch over at the pentagon? >> look, wolf, because of everything you just mentioned, indeed, the u.s. military, the intelligence committee have been watching north korea for days now 24/7
there. >> we were getting phone calls and text messages from loved ones who let us know he was still in the mall and still at large. we knew that probably within 45 minutes of us being in there and we didn't hear he was actually neutralized, that he had committed suicide until a good hour and a half to two hours. >> we are looking at pictures of other guests escorted out of the mall with hands in the the air. 100 police officer from different agencies that responded. at what point did you finally come in contact with those police officers who finally evacuated you and rescued you? >> we were -- by our standard we are not allowed to leave our back room until we were told so. we were waiting for a phone call from mall security to let us know that we were safe to be evacuated. when they called us and let us know the police were outside and they were ready to evacuate us is when we left the back room and we were escorted out to the parking lot of the mall. >> taylor, i know from our prodeucers said you are so shaken up about, this and you are doing this interview from your car because yo
authority. u.s. and european scientists offered advice on nuclear safety. richard meserve is former chairman of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. he says people overseeing the nuclear industry must have technical skills if they are to properly enforce regulations and that those skills must be continuously assesd.d. he f f f f f f should be hired if necessary. andre-claude lacoste is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say prior to the fukushima accident, the operators only implemented the safety measures that were legally required. he said it's dangerous for plant operators to rely only on state regulations and that they should be encouraged to voluntarily enhance safety. the chairman of the nuclear regulation authority says he's not satisfied with the safety awareness level in japan's nuclear plants. shunichi tanaka says the country must boost those measures by listening to the advice of foreign experts.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> criticism of this week will be taken as a more than 100,000 celebrated the launch in pyongyang, including officials from the korean workers party and mili
calling it a test of technology for a missile that could be eventually used in a nuclear attack. many saying this is a huge threat to regional security. north korea is insisting it is just a peaceful effort to put a satellite into orbit. right now the u.n. security council is meeting behind closed doors to discuss a response. in the meantime a lot of talk happening in d.c. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at the pentagon with more on this. so far, what is the reaction? >> reporter: we heard from u.s. officials, they are calling this very highly provocative act. it has been a swift response. we have a statement from national security council spokesman tommy vitter. he said, quote, this action is yet another example of north korea's pattern of irresponsible behavior. the united states remains vigilant in the face of north korean provocations and fully committed to the security of our allies in the region, devoting scarce resources to the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons has not brought north korea security and skaept tans by the international
johns has been following both cases for us. joe, explain the impact of today's decision. >> well, it is big impact. as you know, this is one of those cases that people talk about over the water cooler. let's start with proposition 8. very simple, wolf, it is the california ballot initiative passed in 2008 by the people of the state of california that established marriage as between a man and a woman. it overturned a court case that said same sex couples have the right to marry. windsor is the other case you were talking about, it is an attack on defense of marriage act which was passed in 1996 by the congress, signed by the president. it's called windsor against the united states. it is about a woman named edith windsor who had a long time relationship with her partner, and they were married in 2007. spier died in new york in 2009, and edith windsor got a lot of money. something like $363,000 as a result of that, she was required to pay that in federal estate taxes on her inheritance. she would not have had to pay that money if federal law had given that same sex relationship the
-profile move. north korean authorities say they used a rocket to put a satellite in to orbit. >> translator: japan asked moroco to start discussion on the launch in the council. we would like to deal with this issue civilly by cooperating with the international community. >> translator: north korea's action is threatening the peace and security of the korean peninsula, as well as the world. we strongly denounce the launch of the missile in defiance of repeated calls and warnings by the international community. >> krt made public a picture of what they say is a control facility for the satellite. officials in south korea, japan and elsewhere say the north koreans fired off a long-range missile. japanese government officials say it traveled south over okinawa. they say the launch went at the north koreans had predicted. the first stage fell in to the yellow sea. the nose section fell a short distance beyond that. the second stage dropped in to the pacific ocean east of the philippines. japanese defense officials say they learned of the launch from u.s. missile warning systems around 9:51 japa
next month. >> luca, stay with us. we want to bring you major news out of neighboring korea. south korea has chosen its first ever female president. cheri kay has all the news. how significant is the election of miss park? >> well, i mean, she's really made history, set to become south korea's first woman president. it was a very tight race, a very polarized election with park winning 51.5% of the votes. but in the end, south korea made a choice that means more hope of economic recovery. scenes of joy as the v in south korea's presidential poll. >> this election is your victory. this is a victory brought by the people's hope for overcoming crisis and economic recovery 37. >> the daughter of a former military leader will take office next year as the country's first female president, challenging syria types in a country traditionally ruled by men in suits. she will be tasked with getting the slowing economy back on track at a time when growth rates have risen to a meager 2% now. but she will need to do it in a way that appeases young voters who are calling for more balanced income di
player. that's it for us on "the five." thank you for watching. check us out tomorrow. ♪ ♪ >> chris: the world has become even more dangerous place in the last 24 hours. the obama administration fails to keep north korea from developing and testing a long range missile. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> chris: good evening. i'm chris wallace in for bret baier. north korea today joined the club of nations that have put a satellite in to space. the part that worries people here in washington is the same technology can be aflied to delivering nuclear warheads to the american west coast. north korea is now part of a modern day axis of evil for the u.s. iran is thought to be working on a nuclear bomb. the explosive situation in syria passed another landmark today. we begin with chief washington correspondent james rosen at the state department. on the failure to keep the north koreans grounded. >> with north korea successful launch of the three-stage rocket tuesday night the obama administration was left to ponder the limits of the engagement policy it doggedly pursued with rogue regi
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
>> steve: thanks very much for joining us on this thursday. tomorrow, friday, that means geraldo rivera drops by. >> gretchen: he will. and we're going to have more with the cast from "a christmas story" in our after the show show. we can hardly wait. >> brian: you just finding this out for the first time? >> steve: who needs broadway when you got fox friends friends. see you tomorrow, everybody. bill: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these canni
. bill: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place
meet great people. >> kimberly: welcome back. that's it for us five. thank you for watching. see you back >> i can't decide if i missed you, honestly. >> well, i guess you should leave then. >> was it really only a week? >> such a jerk. >>> let's welcome our guests. she is so hot she is often mistaken for a forest fire. i am here with criminal defense attorney remi spencer. if hilarity was candle i would blow him in the store. and bill schulz. what is he looking at? and if fierce commentary was a mad house i would enter him when my wife was mad at me. and you love to hate him and hate to love him. it is our new york times correspondent who happens to be the actual new york times. good to see you, pinch. where have you been? >> that's not important. what is important is that today in the times, they write with enduring quality of boy bands. none of those fem looking miss screets could compare to my day. >> i remember the sassafrass duet. and then there was the big depression dance craze, suspenders in a barrel. and then my favorite young group , malarkey and balderdash and the old sep
the country where we're headed. stuart, thank you very much. stuart varney with a look at this morning for us. bill: really a stunning figure when you think about number about of people, even now that are dropping out of the labor force, unaccounted for. either their unemployment benefits run out or they're still living off the government and getting that check and that might be for the moment the only source of income. martha: we passed important threshold of 99 weeks a lot of people roll off that number for the very first time sense all this began. it makes you wonder if people are just taking advantage of benefits offered in order to get by if they simply opted out which is a sad situation. bill: what he talks about is 350,000 americans in this report alone. a really staggering the state of our economy now. here's a bit more for the labor report. 12 million americans still unemployed. about 40% of them have been out of work for 27 weeks or longer. more than eight million americans only working part time due to the current state of the economy. martha: new comments about the crisis in syria
when gunfire breaks out at a police station in new jersey. accusations of using children to make a political point. we'll tell you about that "happening now" jon: good morning i'm jon scott along with harris faulkner. with just days to go until the fiscal cliff deadline president obama and top congressional leaders are set for a crucial meeting. expectations are low for a deal when house and senate leaders head to the white house this afternoon to meet there with president obama. lawmakers are increasingly looking at the period following the december 31st deadline we're told to come up with a fix to avoid massive tax hikes and spending cuts, affect lives of nearly every american many economists say could plunge the economy into another recession. chief white house correspondent ed henry live with the latest. so in this meeting, ed, is there any hope they will accomplish anything? >> reporter: well it is pretty low expectations, jon. what we're expecting when you talk to top officials of both parties the president will offer a scaled back plan, something he laid out lines friday b
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
in afghanistan come at a high price the life of a u.s. navy seal. here is the mission. to save an american doctor kidnapped by the taliban. as we go through the story it's a reminder about the sacrifice still being made overseas. good morning i'm bill hemmer. whole new week here at "america's newsroom". martha: i'm martha maccallum. this fallen hero was a member of navy "seal team 6" that carried out the mission to kill usama bin laden. according to officials in afghanistan they came under heavy fire with this mission. >> according to our information the kidnappers were taliban. they were heavily armed with heavy machine guns, with so-called rpg. rocket propelled grenades and ak-47s. bill: steve centanni follows up in washington. what can we report about this rescue machine? >> reporter: good morning bill. it took place early sunday after intelligence revealed the kidnapped american was in imminent danger of injury or death. dr. joseph is a medical advice sore for a group called "morningstar" development based in colorado springs. it is a group that helps rebuild communities in afghanistan. the d
with some sad news today. a u.s. navy seal killed during the daring rescue of an american held captive in the heart of afghanistan. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. when we talk about the american captive, we have a picture of the doctor whose live was saved. he is dylan joseph, a native colorado. he was in afghanistan for humanitarian work when i was kidnapped by the taliban in a province east of kabul. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at pentagon with more. jen, do we have any details on the american who gave his life to save this doctor? >> reporter: they're waiting to contact the family so the military does not release the identity of the seal killed in that rescue attempt. we know he was a member of "seal team 6". not necessarily a member of the same group that carried out the usama bin laden raid. there are about 200 members of "seal team 6". this man, as you said, gave his life for his fellow american. here is a statement that was read by the spokesman for isaf today. >> it has been decided to start the operations since the assessment the
that as well. >> all right, i'm don lemon. thank you so much for joining us. the cnn newsroom continues right now with ms. ashley banfield. >> don lemon, thank you so much. it's nice to have you in new york, my friend. good to see you in person. 11:00 on the east coast, 8:00 a.m. on the west coast, and you might say north korea is thumbing its nose at the world by launching a rocket this morning that appeared to put a satellite in orbit. the launch moves north korea one step closer to developing nuclear arms missile capable weapons that are possibly capable of hitting us here in the united states. we have north korean video that purports to show the actual launch. take a look. whether a satellite indeed is in orbit has not been completely confirmed. the north american aerospace defend command, norad, says the rocket deployed an object that appeared to achieve orbit. the u.s., japan, south korea and the united nations all denounce the launch with washington, calling it a highly provocative act that threatens regional security. this hour the u.n. security council is meeting behind closed doors
country escalates. >>> 30 u.s. banks in the cross-hairs of cyberattackers. new warnings about a potential fraud attack. >>> starting today you might notice a big difference in tv commercials. we'll tell you about, "happening now." yes it is 12/13. doesn't have the ring. jenna: doesn't have the same exact ring. still a good day. jon: still a good day. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: hi, everybody, i'm jenna lee. we have new concerns about north korea heading toward a new nuclear test after defiantly launching a rocket into orbit as we've been reporting to you here. north korean state television reporting, this is the video of the launch at the command center in that country. this rocket is similar to one that could carry an automatic warhead as far as california. while it appears to be orbiting the earth normally we're getting the word the rocket may not be functioning all that well. general fir griffin from the pentagon. what else are we learning about this launch? >> reporter: there is confusion how successful the rocket launch was. u.s. officials confirmed to fox news while i
-open. all i'm saying is i think h the power to bring people together simpson style. that's it for us. thanks for watching. erin burnett out front starts now. >>> "outfront" next, 27 days away from the fiscal cliff. things are getting silly. octogenarians doing gangnam style. plus, what the united states is anning to do if assad uses chemical weapons against his own people. and 24-year-old amy copeland contracted a deadly flesh eating disease in may. doctors gave her a 1% chance of "outfront" to talk about it. let's go "outfront." tonight, gangnam style. yep, this is how one man sees the fiscal cliff and it's a pretty important man. this is alan simpson. ♪ yep. that maybe the most action the fiscal cliff saw today. here's the scene on capitol hill at noon. yep, people leaving. members of congress leaving washington, heading home on wednesday afternoon. one man left standing was the house speaker and he says i'm not going anywhere. >> i'll be here and i'll be available at any moment to sit down with the president to get serious about solving this problem. >> but of course, it takes t
to get people to safety when she heard the terrifying gunshots. she's now live on the phone with us. taylor, can you hear me? >> are yes. >> describe the scene as best you saw it unfold. >> i was actual. ly walking from the back of my store toward the front when i heard the first gunshot. my first thought was something large has fallen but they were within a half second of each other and by the third shot, i thought, this is happening this is real. these are gunshots and this is going on. i changed glances with my manager and it was go time that we needed to get to safety. we were escorting guests that were in our store as well as guests in the corridor of the mall in the hallway and other employees who work at kiosks that are throughout the middle of the mall and in to our back room. as these shots were being fired. >> taylor, you have a security gate at the store that you work in. were you able to get that security gate closed and effectively seal off the people who you were able to get in the store? >> i was. actually after we got everybody in to our back room i realized the gate
and cozy. jon: good to have you here. thank you for joining us today. have a great weekend. "america live" starts right now. maybe. >> the u.s. and a potentially devastating blow. a temporary deal is reached to stop a looming strike at american courts for now. good to see you. welcome to "america live", i am gregg jarrett. heather: and i am heather. megyn kelly is off today. it looks like they will have 30 days to come up with a plan to avert a strike to put many americans out of the work. we will bring them on the story as we get get the details. the first time in developing this hour we are awaiting a high-stakes meeting at the white house between president obama and congressional leaders on the fiscal crisis. the talks are a last-ditch effort to avoid spending cuts and tax hikes from 90% of american households. mike emanuel is live on capitol hill where all the action is taking place. is there a lot of action? there is a lot of buzz on capitol hill. mitch mcconnell, who will be attending a white house meeting told us a few moments ago that we are always the running out of time. chairma
in west virginia. would natural gas use booming across the u.s., is the risk for more accident spiking right along with it? we'll get answers. >>> plus north korea gives the world the finger, successfully launching a long-range missile for the very first time. iranian officials were reportedly there to witness it. so is north korea ready to sell technology to our most dangerous enemy? >> newark mayor cory booker completes a week on food stamps wanting to know what it is like to live on $1.40 a meal. food stamp use is rising faster than job growth, did you know that? isn't that the problem that needs solving? charles payne is explains how booker misses the point entirely. even when its not it is always about money melissa: first, let's take a look at the day's market headlines the fed announced new measures to help stimulate the economy but apparently investors were not impressed by fed chairman bernanke's afternoon press conference. stocks gave up all of their early gains and the dow closed down two points. >>> shares of warren buffett's berkshire hathaway getting a jolt. the company i
the camp. >> you thought everybody lived in a prison camp like this? >> translator: yes. >> shin told us this was the house where he was born. his mother and father were prisoners whose marriage, if you could call it that, was arranged by the guards as a reward for hard work. >> did they live together? did they see each other every day? >> translator: no. you can't live together. only when they worked hard could they be together. >> did they love each other? >> translator: i don't know. in my eyes, we were not a family. we were just prisoners. >> how do you mean? >> translator: you wear what you're given, you eat what you're given, and you only do what you're told to do. so there's nothing that the parent can do for you and there's nothing that the children can do for their parents. >> this may be a very dumb question, but did you even know what love was when you were for the first 23 years of your life? >> translator: i still don't know what that means. >> love may have been absent but fear was not. in this building, a school of sorts, shin says he watched his teacher beat a little girl
it for us tonight. rachel will be back tomorrow with great hair. now it is time for the last word. rachel will be back tomorrow with great hair, as always. up next, "first look." >>> right now on "first look," terror at an. on. shopping mall as a mass gunman opens fire, killing two people. >>> north korea successfully fires a long-range rocket, defying the threat of international sanctions. >>> plus, michigan's right to work, a cosmic close shave and an update for you on that little guy, the ikea monkey in canada. >>> but first, good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. and the hustle and bustle of the holiday season took a terrifying turn in portland, oregon, yesterday, when a masked gunman stormed into a busy shopping mall and opened fire, killing two people, injuring another before apparently turning the gun on himself. nbc's kirk gregory has the chilling details. >> reporter: a day of holiday shopping turned into a horrific afternoon of terror when a gunman opened fire inside a crowded suburban portland mall. >> we started receiving calls at 3:30, multiple 911 calls. we responded quickl
in recent days. against that backdrop, president obama announced tuesday that the u.s. will now formally recognize the syrian opposition movement. >> we've made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all be
impression on a great many people around the world, and especially on the 100 of us who serve here. he commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for
martha: thanks for being with us, everybody. the driving dogs has to wait unfor the in the leave. it's outstanding we'll catch you on the radio in about 20 minutes. martha: see you there, by, guys. jenna: breaking information in the benghazi terror investigation, as we await news from a bipartisan classified briefing on that deadly attack back on september 11th when terrorists killed four americans, including our ambassador to libya. we are staking out the hearing if case any lawmakers decide to talk. catherine herridge will bring us a live report a little later on in the show. >> reporter: i want to go live to the president who is speaking before a group of business leaders, let's listen in. >> it's good to be back at the business roundtable. jim, thanks for your leadership. originally my team had prepared some remarks, they always get nervous when -- when i'm out there on my own, you never know what i might say. but given the dialogue that we had the last time i thought it was useful for me to abbreviate my remarks, speak off the cuff at the top and spend most of our time just
." that's it for us. thanks for watching. >>> "outfront" next, breaking news on north korea's launch of a long-range rocket. what we're learning about just how much control the country has over that satellite. plus, erin burnett has an exclusive interview with defense secretary, leon panetta about this launch. she also talks with him about syria, what we're learning tonight about the forces loyal to president bashar al assad, and how scud missiles have been fired. >>> the united states government says it shows just how desperate assad's regime is now getting. >>> and also, our first look at the shooter who police believe is responsible for last night's deadly rampage in a portland-area mall. police have identified him as well as the two people that he killed. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm ashleigh banfield in for erin burnett tonight who is on assignment in afghanistan. we've got breaking news right off the top. cnn just learning that the united states does not believe that north korea is in full control of that satellite that it sent into space with the long-r
to dissuade north korea from launching a missile. although they say for satellite into outer space it's using the same technology that's important, that would be used to launch a nuclear warhead. this type of missile technology is expressly covered under u.n. security council resolutions, prohibiting such testing of missiles and the type of technology, supported by china even. the last time in spring when china tried to launch a satellite, but it failed using this technology, china said we need to come out with a presidential statement from the united nations on this presidential statement condemning the actions of north korea can set the stage for tougher actions in the future if china -- if north korea were to launch another missile. that missile has been launched. we now think it's time for tougher actions since her engaging diplomatically with china and other members of the u.n. security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions against north korea. >> make any progress quick >> if you type to the state department to figure out what's going on. we've conveyed very frankly, can
is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as they're trying to move from an export driven economy to a more domestic consumption based economy, they will still rely heavily on exports. the more americans are working, the more money they have in their pockets, the more they will be shopping in stores, and so much of what they buy is made from many other countries, including china. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more that china will export. that means jobs for the chinese people. >> when you talk to leaders, how much are they actually were it about united states? -- worried about united states? >> i think united states is incredibly important to china, and recognize that. not only in very practical ways, but in another way, more psychological. there is a 150 year history were china has been trying to check itself up in big shin itself upr status. there is this lingering psychological mindset of china being victimized by the great powers. it is kind of a struggle
paper also uses the phrase enemy to define north korea. it notes the reclusive nation has honed missile technology through several tests and cites analysis of satellite images and concludes that scientists are enriching uranium at a new facility. >>> the defense and foreign policy files are just two in a stack that will be on park's desk when she takes over as president. many south koreans want her to rein in the country's conglomerates. these big business blocks have helped fuel the economy but they've also been suffocating small and medium sized companies. our reporter has the story. >> reporter: this man loves serving up bread and other goods to customers who visit his small bakery. he says his products are tasty and affordable. but the business he bought a year ago is facing an uncertain future. >> translator: we are all in a life or death situation. >> reporter: south korea used to have 18,000 small independent bakeries. but by the beginning of this year, only about 4,000 were still open. the pressure has come from big business, conglomerates have opened their own bakeries. you can
reports, this latest white paper also uses the phrase enmany toy define north korea. it notes the reclusive nation has honed missile technology through several tests and cites analysis of imaged and scientists in the north are enriching uranium. at a new facility. >>> the defense and foreign policy files are just two in a stack that will be on park's desk when she takes over as president. many south koreans want her to rein in the country's conglomerates. these big business blocks have helped fuel the economy but they've also been suffocating small and medium sized companies. our reporter has the story. rpt this man loves serving up bread and other goods to customers who visit his small bakery. he says his products are tasty and affordable. but the business he bought a year ago is facing an uncertain future. >> translator: we are all in a life or death situation. >> reporter: south korea used to have 18,000 small independent bakeries. but by the beginning of this year, only about 4,000 were still open. the pressure has come from big business, conglomerates have opened their ow
aren't supposed to happen. >> let's get right to the scene. dan, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, the main question this morning, and it's really the question anytime you have one of these shootings, is who was the shooter, what was the motive, and were any of the victims targeted or was it simply random. at this point we don't know any of that. when we do know is it started about 3:30 in the afternoon, the shooter carrying some kind of rifle. he was seen jogging through the macy's and the shots rang out somewhere near the food court area. he was wearing dark clothing. some kind of hockey mask. when it was all over as you said, three were tedead, you including the gunman. >> i was in the elevator going downstairs and people start saying go up, go up. and we just didn't know what's did go on. we just tried to escape. it was scary. was shobing experience. >> reporter: authorities say they have tentatively identified the shooter, but they're not telling us who he is. he's reportedly in his 20s. they're not telling us anything about the victims. we can tell you that the mall wi
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. this is according to a u.s. official to our barbara starr at the pentagon. up until now, by most accounts, this launch has been seen as a success, or certainly it raised the bar on how we view their capabilities. erin burnett spoke with defense secretary leon panetta, exclusively in kabul about this very issue. take a look. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for taking the time. >> good to be with you, erin. >> i wanted to start by asking you about north korea. i know, obviously, they've had failures with rocket launches and eight months ago they failed. now they've had a success. and i'm wondering if you know how they fixed it or whether they might have had help from another country? >> we have no idea. as a matter of fact, we're still assessing just exactly what happened here to look at each of the stages and determine whether or not it really was a success or not. but, you know, the fact that they've launched this missile is a clear provocation. we've warned them not toot it. we've been very concerned about their firing this missile. in violation of every international standard and ru
for joining us. in the meantime, anderson cooper 360 starts right now. >> ashley thank you. good evening. we begin tonht keeping them honest searching for facts holding people in government accountable. tonight we are going to show you a place so horrific it is tough to believe it exists. a modern day concentration camp. this concentration camp is in north korea a country that is right now publicly celebrating the launch of a missile. >> after four successful failures north korea shocked the world with this launch. nuclear war heads to the west coast of the united states. >> these images showed people celebrating in north korea. tonight there are signs that the north korea people not totally in control of the device. >> but tonight on north korean tv the anchor was so excited. while much of the world is talking about misslles tonight, there is a crime against humanity occurring in that country. a crime that receives little attention. 150,000 people blifr believed to ing terrible things. these prisons house entire families. grandparents, parents and children. a system called three generations
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